code repo?

Hi guys!

where is the code repo? can't seem to find it.

thanks!!!

-BlueMeanie

Comments

  • JasperJasper Eindhoven, the NetherlandsMember Posts: 514 ✭✭✭
    <a href="https://github.com/ethereum/">https://github.com/ethereum/</a>
  • JasperJasper Eindhoven, the NetherlandsMember Posts: 514 ✭✭✭
    Yes, well there is a whole bunch of repositories behind that link.

    The <a href="https://github.com/ethereum/cpp-ethereum">cpp-ethereum</a> one can be build with <code>cmake .; make</code> Note that you may want to go into one of the branches. (like POC-4)

    Also note that the are proof of concepts and this is a testnet. It may not all work perfectly, and the ethers there are intended to be worth nothing.
  • JasperJasper Eindhoven, the NetherlandsMember Posts: 514 ✭✭✭
    There is no real reason to have your own testnet.. You can just test alongside others, and the mining difficulty is low enough to get enough to put on things to try, or you can ask for testethers on irc/the forum/skype.

    I do wish there was a way to use a fake blockchain as test rig...
  • JasperJasper Eindhoven, the NetherlandsMember Posts: 514 ✭✭✭
    Well, it is a yes but i'd rather you dont :) AFAIK, making an alternative testnet works the same as with bitcoin, you just change the genesis block.

    It is really easy, hence the hundreds of coins out there. I suggest you stick to the one with aims that suit you. That would one with new features, a lot of developers, and no big centralized party controlling. One with a history showing so, that allows you to look at the code, and write articles why they do things, i.e., this one. :-p
  • JasperJasper Eindhoven, the NetherlandsMember Posts: 514 ✭✭✭
    edited May 2014
    Yes.. Well <a href="https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=563925.40">someone already planning to do it</a>.(https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=563925.40)

    To be frank, I would recommend against it, and against the altcoin. <a href="http://blog.ethereum.org/2014/04/30/decentralized-protocol-monetization-and-forks/">there is a really long blog post about it</a>.(http://blog.ethereum.org/2014/04/30/decentralized-protocol-monetization-and-forks) Basically, the developers are here, they're good,(in multiple senses of the word) and they are the one socially tying yet more developers in. They will support Ethereum, not the fork.

    Of course if you need a currency like for stocks paying dividents or a million other uses, you can always use a subcurrency contract variant.
  • JasperJasper Eindhoven, the NetherlandsMember Posts: 514 ✭✭✭
    @BlueMeanie edited my post above if you want links.(forum html input broke..) Yes, it could do everything the original can. But the value of the two will be separate, and we will be on the other one, contracts cannot talk accross to each other. The 'lame fork'(because that is what it is, not doing the work and trying to get credit for your fork) shouldnt draw much attention, to be frank.
  • JasperJasper Eindhoven, the NetherlandsMember Posts: 514 ✭✭✭
    edited May 2014
    Funny link :) in many ways it is not like coffee. It is not like there inherently went some amount of work, energy and land to grow coffee beans to make the ethers.

    Largely the value of a cryptocurrency is a Schelling point. The thing that limits it is the perceived risk of the value going down, compared to the usefulness of doing things with the coin. Expect a lot of the ethers in the Ethereum DAO to be locked into the contract with a time release, in order to make users' relationship with Ethereum more trustless.(though you still have trust the combination of Ethereum developers, you, others, reviewers hired by Ethereum to review code)
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