Parallel mining?

mikkaamikkaa Member Posts: 4
If I would be mining with multiple machines, what would the simples way to 'combine' the results? Without having to worry about ether being stuck on the client its mined with.

I guess there are multiple ways to achieve this:

1) Some script that sends newly mined ether immediately to a certain ether address 'main wallet'.
2) Keep the wallets on a shared disk.
3) Mining pools?

All of these can be done with some coding, but will there be some out of the box feature supporting parallel mining with x amount of clients/machines?

Comments

  • carloscarlsoncarloscarlson Member Posts: 10
    I think that the thinking goes that Ethereum's short block times will negate any benefits of a mining pool. I suspect that in practice, people might figure out new ways to win more blocks involving multiple computers. But this point, it might be too early to really know how to maximize your mining rewards.

    I would like to know a more concrete answer to this as well.
  • mcmike313mcmike313 Member Posts: 27
    even with short mining times, surely combining your miners would spread the luck, i love the idea of combining my workstations with a few other family members/friends and increase the constant source of income, flicking my work phone on when at work and hooked up to a charger might not mine a block for a week but is still contributing to my overall hashrate. i will pay someone for the code to set this up exactly like a pool where you are paid per share(contribution) to the pool and have the ability to auto pay out and stats on miners and the ability to implement a 1% fee or something similar, so all the noobs who want to get involved i can point them at my pool to earn a fraction of an ether rather then waiting to hit a block
  • ImAMiner?ImAMiner? Member Posts: 208 ✭✭
    @mikaa - The simplest way this can be achieved is to send the ether mined on each client machine to a master wallet either on one of the mining computers or to a wallet on a non-mining computer. Just make a manual payment, no need to set up a script to do this. Another option is to have one wallet on either a mining computer or a non-mining computer and have all your miners mine to that one wallet (they'll need to be on the same network, and it's more complicated to set up). Both of these situations mean you will be doing what is called solo-mining. Unless you have a high hashrate you're going to want to use a pool.

    @carloscarlson - The short block times have nothing to do with mining on pools. Mining on pools simply provides smooth steady payouts. If you are solo-mining depending on your hashrate you may go a long time without finding a block but with a pool you'll know when you get paid. Over time the expected payout is the same for solo-mining and pool mining for any given your hashrate.

    @mcmike313 - Combining your miners doesn't really spread the luck and definitely doesn't increase your luck. Your luck is just a function of your total hashrate. Luck comes into play if you're solo-mining because you could have bad luck and go for a while without finding a block or you could be lucky and find a block back to back. It all averages out over time. The situation that you are describing, having many people on different networks, mine to a central location is pool mining. You can set up your own pool. If ether allows it the easiest way for you to do this is to set up a p2pool. No need to pay someone to set this up, it's open source on github and directions are out there and meets all your requirements listed. If ether doesn't allow p2pool then you can set up a mpos pool, which is what a lot of the commercial pools will be using. Mpos is also open source, though I've never set one of these up, I think it's easily doable. Mining with your phone is going to be more gimmick than anything, you'll want to keep track of electrical usage to see if it's even worth it for you to mine on any device (if not you could mine for speculation) Or you could you mine at a loss just because you like the idea and potential ether has.

    If you guys already have your hardware, I think it would be worth it to start mining some coin to get your feet wet with wallets, different software, networking, etc Your best chance to turn a profit will be right when mining is opened up.
  • carloscarlsoncarloscarlson Member Posts: 10
    edited March 2015
    Thanks @ImAMiner?

    I would love to test out my setup, but right now I am having trouble understanding how to try a GPU on the testnet.

    I was able to CPU mine with the Go CLI about a week ago. If you could point me to some resources on how to test my GPU, I would really appreciate it.

    I'm running Ubuntu 14.10
  • ImAMiner?ImAMiner? Member Posts: 208 ✭✭
    @carloscarlson What kind of gpu do you have and what drivers do you have installed? I don't have any practical experience with nvidia, only amd, but it's generally the same just different software. As far as I know there is no gpu miner for ether yet, I could be wrong though. So you'll want to find a coin to test. You can find the most profitable coins to mine here http://www.whattomine.com/ Vanillacoin can be pretty straight forward.
  • mcmike313mcmike313 Member Posts: 27
    do you know if mpos will be able to mine mpos at launch or will we need to wait a while for this to be added in?
  • ImAMiner?ImAMiner? Member Posts: 208 ✭✭
    @mcmike313 if you're asking if mpos-type pools will be available at launch, I don't know. It's not something that needs to be added in with an upgrade or something. In fact just perusing here https://blog.ethereum.org/2014/06/19/mining/ it looks like the developers are trying to figure out a way to discourage commercial pools ( and hence centralization of miners ) but provide a p2pool sort of solution. That blog post states this. A third factor is convenience; this can best be solved by funding an easy-to-use open-source make-your-own mining pool solution, in a similar spirit to the software used by many small VPS providers; if deemed important, we may end up partially funding a network-agnostic version of such an effort. So at least as of June 19th, it was still up in the air. I just found that stuff in the last few minutes so there may be a better answer out there, but it looks like the developers want pool mining available but not highly centralized pool mining, which is nothing new. Tough to do with so many smart people figuring out ways to game each other. Anyway I'm going to keep looking around because I may set up a p2pool if mining ether is profitable. I'll post if I find anything useful.
  • mikkaamikkaa Member Posts: 4
    edited April 2015
    ImAMiner? said:

    The simplest way this can be achieved is to send the ether mined on each client machine to a master wallet either on one of the mining computers or to a wallet on a non-mining computer. Just make a manual payment, no need to set up a script to do this. Another option is to have one wallet on either a mining computer or a non-mining computer and have all your miners mine to that one wallet (they'll need to be on the same network, and it's more complicated to set up). Both of these situations mean you will be doing what is called solo-mining. Unless you have a high hashrate you're going to want to use a pool.


    Sending the mined ether manually to a master wallet, does not sound efficient if the miner has more than a couple computer mining. I would need to do these transactions all the time.

    At the moment I'm thinking that maybe a bat-file could launch ethereum mining with a generated wallet sending the mined to a main wallet every hours. When the computer is rebooted a new temporal node is created.

    The optimal situation would be a setup (installation zip/setup.exe/or linux image etc..) that includes the ethereum client and a script that starts up the mining process, generates a temporal ethereum wallet with instructions to send the mined ether to whatever predesignated main wallet address.

    Not sure yet what would be the optimal way to set up this these automated mining nodes. If there is a hardware failure or other problem, I would know that the node would have sent the ether at least an hour a go (or whatever the mining interval would be).

    So one time setup for mining modes and the balance of the main wallet would keep growing, with a minimal effort to setup a node and a minimal risk of losing ether in case a single node fails.

  • ImAMiner?ImAMiner? Member Posts: 208 ✭✭
    mikkaa said:

    ImAMiner? said:

    The simplest way this can be achieved is to send the ether mined on each client machine to a master wallet either on one of the mining computers or to a wallet on a non-mining computer. Just make a manual payment, no need to set up a script to do this. Another option is to have one wallet on either a mining computer or a non-mining computer and have all your miners mine to that one wallet (they'll need to be on the same network, and it's more complicated to set up). Both of these situations mean you will be doing what is called solo-mining. Unless you have a high hashrate you're going to want to use a pool.


    Sending the mined ether manually to a master wallet, does not sound efficient if the miner has more than a couple computer mining. I would need to do these transactions all the time.

    At the moment I'm thinking that maybe a bat-file could launch ethereum mining with a generated wallet sending the mined to a main wallet every hours. When the computer is rebooted a new temporal node is created.

    The optimal situation would be a setup (installation zip/setup.exe/or linux image etc..) that includes the ethereum client and a script that starts up the mining process, generates a temporal ethereum wallet with instructions to send the mined ether to whatever predesignated main wallet address.

    Not sure yet what would be the optimal way to set up this these automated mining nodes. If there is a hardware failure or other problem, I would know that the node would have sent the ether at least an hour a go (or whatever the mining interval would be).

    So one time setup for mining modes and the balance of the main wallet would keep growing, with a minimal effort to setup a node and a minimal risk of losing ether in case a single node fails.

    To each his own I suppose. I actually did this setup with a p2pool and would just remote in with Teamviewer or chrome remote desktop and just initiate the transfer on my miners. I just like to keep things simple. That being said here you go, someone has already written the script for ubuntu and the bitcoin wallet.

    http://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/questions/1495/is-there-a-way-to-automatically-send-bitcoins-from-one-wallet-to-another

    Most of these alt-coins use the bitcoin wallet as a base, ethereum could be different though. There are probably other solutions or scripts out there. That was just the first hit on google.

    As for your other concerns, there is software that will monitor your miners including auto starting miners on bootup, restarting miners with sick or dead cards, restarting miners if your hashrate falls below a specified threashold, etc. I use CGWatcher (and CGRemote) and CryptoGlance, there are others out there, miner.farm is one. Oh and you won't lose any ether if a miner with a wallet crashes. The transaction is stored on the blockchain so when you boot back up your wallet will sync.
  • TruthchanterTruthchanter Member Posts: 549 ✭✭✭
    ImAMiner? said:

    mikkaa said:

    ImAMiner? said:

    The simplest way this can be achieved is to send the ether mined on each client machine to a master wallet either on one of the mining computers or to a wallet on a non-mining computer. Just make a manual payment, no need to set up a script to do this. Another option is to have one wallet on either a mining computer or a non-mining computer and have all your miners mine to that one wallet (they'll need to be on the same network, and it's more complicated to set up). Both of these situations mean you will be doing what is called solo-mining. Unless you have a high hashrate you're going to want to use a pool.


    Sending the mined ether manually to a master wallet, does not sound efficient if the miner has more than a couple computer mining. I would need to do these transactions all the time.

    At the moment I'm thinking that maybe a bat-file could launch ethereum mining with a generated wallet sending the mined to a main wallet every hours. When the computer is rebooted a new temporal node is created.

    The optimal situation would be a setup (installation zip/setup.exe/or linux image etc..) that includes the ethereum client and a script that starts up the mining process, generates a temporal ethereum wallet with instructions to send the mined ether to whatever predesignated main wallet address.

    Not sure yet what would be the optimal way to set up this these automated mining nodes. If there is a hardware failure or other problem, I would know that the node would have sent the ether at least an hour a go (or whatever the mining interval would be).

    So one time setup for mining modes and the balance of the main wallet would keep growing, with a minimal effort to setup a node and a minimal risk of losing ether in case a single node fails.

    To each his own I suppose. I actually did this setup with a p2pool and would just remote in with Teamviewer or chrome remote desktop and just initiate the transfer on my miners. I just like to keep things simple. That being said here you go, someone has already written the script for ubuntu and the bitcoin wallet.

    http://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/questions/1495/is-there-a-way-to-automatically-send-bitcoins-from-one-wallet-to-another

    Most of these alt-coins use the bitcoin wallet as a base, ethereum could be different though. There are probably other solutions or scripts out there. That was just the first hit on google.

    As for your other concerns, there is software that will monitor your miners including auto starting miners on bootup, restarting miners with sick or dead cards, restarting miners if your hashrate falls below a specified threashold, etc. I use CGWatcher (and CGRemote) and CryptoGlance, there are others out there, miner.farm is one. Oh and you won't lose any ether if a miner with a wallet crashes. The transaction is stored on the blockchain so when you boot back up your wallet will sync.
    I used to use CGWatcher for litecoin/doge/other scrypt coins. Does that work for ethereum or know any others? I'm gonna look up CryptoGlance
  • ImAMiner?ImAMiner? Member Posts: 208 ✭✭
    No, those don't work. Claymore has a remote management tool, that's the only one I'm aware of, Genoil and Claymore have failover stuff.
  • TruthchanterTruthchanter Member Posts: 549 ✭✭✭
    ImAMiner? said:

    No, those don't work. Claymore has a remote management tool, that's the only one I'm aware of, Genoil and Claymore have failover stuff.

    Thanks I may checkout the claymore remote management tool
  • TruthchanterTruthchanter Member Posts: 549 ✭✭✭
    ImAMiner? said:

    No, those don't work. Claymore has a remote management tool, that's the only one I'm aware of, Genoil and Claymore have failover stuff.

    im not familiar with genoil, is it faster than regular eth/qtminer?
  • ImAMiner?ImAMiner? Member Posts: 208 ✭✭
    Possibly if you're using a pool that accepts stale shares (and shares that have the incorrect nonce). It does have a lot more features however.
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