Ethereum wallet

Hi guys,
I bought some Ether in an exchange, The problem is that I don't believe that storing it for a long time in an exchange is a smart Idea :)
How can I create a paper wallet, or even download and backup a file like Bitcoin core wallet?

Thanks

Comments

  • oliverkxoliverkx Member Posts: 85
    I don't believe that a stable GUI wallet exists yet, although there are a few alpha versions out there. I currently use the geth.exe command-line client (on Windows). Download the client from github (https://github.com/ethereum/go-ethereum/releases), let it sync to the current block, create an account (write down your PW), and back-up the corresponding key file. You can then transfer your Ether from the exchange to the account you created. Once a stable GUI wallet is released, you will be able to use it to access your existing account.

    ps: I always override the default location for the geth data files, so I know where they are. Also, I usually keep the key files for accounts with any significant amount of Ether in cold-storage (on a USB stick, or other secure location).
  • canaanitecanaanite Member Posts: 4
    Thanks! I'll give it a shot :)
  • oliverkxoliverkx Member Posts: 85
    here are some steps to get you going - but no guarantees... =)

    1 - create a folder to store the Ethereum data in

    2 - launch geth.exe and let it synchronize wuth the block-chain:
    (note: you may need to tell Windows firewall to allow traffic from geth the first time around)
    > geth --datadir "~~your path to an existing folder here~~"

    3 - once you're in sync (check against stats.ethdev.com), stop geth (Ctrl+C) and create your account:
    > geth --datadir "~~your path to an existing folder here~~" account new

    4 - store your account Id somewhere safe.
    Also, backup the corresponding key file under:
    "~~your path to an existing folder here~~"\data\keystore

    you can view your account (or any other for which you have a key file) using:
    > geth --datadir "~~your path to an existing folder here~~" account list

    5 - You're now ready to transfer your Ether to that account.
    If you have a large sum that you're not planning on using right away,
    then you may want to move your key file into cold-storage (somewhere where only an admin user has access to, or on a removable drive).

    6 - you can also run geth in console mode like this:
    geth --datadir "~~your path to an existing folder here~~" console 2>>yourlogfilename.log

    this allows you to create accounts, get balances, initiate transfers, etc:

    eth.getBalance("0x~~your account number here~~").toNumber();
    eth.sendTransaction({from: "0x~~some account~~", to: "0x~~some other account~~", value: "~~some amount~~"});

    type "exit" [enter] to exit console mode
  • canaanitecanaanite Member Posts: 4
    Amazing! it takes me back to the years I used msdos :)
    Thanks for the guide oliver!
  • canaanitecanaanite Member Posts: 4
    Someone at BitcoinTalk sent me to this website "https://www.myetherwallet.com/"
    Do you know it? Is it considered safe? It's much easier to handle than geth
  • ordoeordoe tehranMember Posts: 132 ✭✭
    0) https://www.myetherwallet.com/
    1) Never ever forget your passphrase
    2) Print
    ...
    n) Profit
  • oliverkxoliverkx Member Posts: 85
    I don't have any experience with it. It looks pretty cool, and I like the QR code feature, but I don't fully understand how it works. Since it does not require a locally running eth or geth client, I have to assume that it connects to some central server, which means that you would have to trust that server with your private key. Probably not a big deal as long as you only keep small amounts of Ether in your wallet, but I would remain cautious.

    Of course, the source code for the wallet is published on GitHub, so you could download it, check it for anything suspicious, and then host a clone of the site yourself, in an environment that you control. But this will probably require running an eth or geth client with the full block-chain on that server.

    Heck, maybe I should do that myself...

    ps: after reading a bit more on their site, it does look pretty good. Only thing is I could not find my wallet files in the location they indicate (%APPDATA%/Ethereum/keystore), which goes to confirm the fact that I don't yet fully understand this thing.
  • DimifrederixDimifrederix Member Posts: 2
    hey, just for information i am using "etherdiene Ethereum wallet 0.9.2" linked with a running geth. simple and easy to use.
    Happy with till today but would be feeling more secure when would have a standard wallet availlable.

    Greetings
    D.
  • ordoeordoe tehranMember Posts: 132 ✭✭
    edited November 2015
    oliverkx said:

    I don't have any experience with it. It looks pretty cool, and I like the QR code feature, but I don't fully understand how it works. Since it does not require a locally running eth or geth client, I have to assume that it connects to some central server, which means that you would have to trust that server with your private key. Probably not a big deal as long as you only keep small amounts of Ether in your wallet, but I would remain cautious.

    Of course, the source code for the wallet is published on GitHub, so you could download it, check it for anything suspicious, and then host a clone of the site yourself, in an environment that you control. But this will probably require running an eth or geth client with the full block-chain on that server.

    Heck, maybe I should do that myself...

    ps: after reading a bit more on their site, it does look pretty good. Only thing is I could not find my wallet files in the location they indicate (%APPDATA%/Ethereum/keystore), which goes to confirm the fact that I don't yet fully understand this thing.

    to generate keys you dont need a running client. the paper wallet simply creates cryptographically valid wallets which can be used offline. your ether will be stored on the blockchain and you only need to import the keys to a running client if you want to spend them.

    Have a read https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Paper_wallet - for bitcoin it's pretty much the same for ether.
  • oliverkxoliverkx Member Posts: 85
    Thanks! I guess that makes sense.

    Since I am suffering of extreme OCD, I would never transfer any large amount of Ether to an account I haven't tested first.

    My procedure is:
    1 - Create the account
    2 - Transfer a small amount of Ether to the new account
    3 - Unlock the account
    4 - Transfer a small amount of Ether out of the account
    5 - If steps 1 through 4 succeeded, use the account for any amounts of Ether.

    I therefore would never create an account off-line with the intent of transferring significant value to it, especially if I must rely on non-core / third-party code (i.e. not the "official" eth or geth).
  • estevaozabotestevaozabot Member Posts: 29
    I have a problem, I'm three days synchronizing the geth .. This right?
  • oliverkxoliverkx Member Posts: 85
    The more recent versions of geth worked pretty well for me. But you do need a decent internet connection, and a decent CPU (to verify each synchronized block).
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