A structure that can handle any contract

The following will work for any transaction, meet regulatory approval, and provide any imaginable functionality. Stock market to grocery stores, retail and wholesale.


Stock Exchange example:

My offer 100 IBM. Offer 100 IBM at $10/share.
My terms $1000.
His counter $970. Bid 100 IBM at $9.70/share.
My counter $980. Offer 100 IBM at $9.80/share.
He accepts. Buyer hit the offer.

Example: I have 11 oranges and want 10 apples

My Offer 11 oranges
My Terms 10 apples
His Terms-escrow AAA Escrow Co.
His Terms-value 10 oranges
His Counter-value 9 apples
His Counter [computer-generated contract]
My Terms-escrow ABC Escrow Co.
My Terms-value 9 apples, 1 soda
My Counter-value 10 oranges
My Counter [computer-generated contract]
His Terms-value 8 oranges
His Counter-value 2 sodas
His Counter-value 9 apples
His Counter [computer-generated contract]
I Accept

Computer-generated contract:

He owes 9 apples, 2 sodas
I owe 8 oranges
Terms: ABC Escrow Co.


Database columns
EventID
TransactionID
CommerceID
EventType
Description
TimeStamp

Event Types
Offer
Terms (value, escrow)
Accept
Counter (offer, value)
Notice
Complete
Cancel
Deliver?
Receipt?

The above provides a full audit trail. All data is stored in text format. "Relational" data is stored in ancillary tables with the EventID for reference.

The above works intra-firm as well as inter-firm. It is an EDI format that operates on an event-basis, so it works the same on paper. The protocol allows flexibility in mode of transfer and security, without changing the structure.
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